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Prostate Problem Guide

Prostate Medicine Used For The Treatment Of An Enlarged Prostate

Although the majority of men in the 60s and 70s will suffer from an enlarged prostate a significant proportion will have very few symptoms or will experience a range of relatively mild symptoms and will be happy to live with these without treatment as one of the inevitable consequences of growing old. For others however the symptoms produced by an enlarged prostate will be troublesome enough for them to seek prostate medicine from their doctor.

The first line of attack is normally to prescribe one of two groups of drugs commonly used in cases of an enlarged prostate (otherwise often referred to as benign prostatic hyperplasia, benign prostatic hypertrophy or BPH).

The first group of drugs is known as "alpha-blockers". Originally used in the treatment of hypertension (high blood pressure), these drugs act by relaxing the muscles of both the prostate gland and the neck of the bladder and remove pressure on the urethra to ease the flow of urine.

Alpha-blockers are normally taken orally once or twice a day and act immediately. Some of the side-effects can include dizziness, light-headedness, headaches, tiredness, difficulties in breathing and stomach and intestinal problems.

One important thing to remember about alpha-blockers is that they do not actually reduce the size of the prostate and that their effect will only be felt for as long as you continue taking the tablets.

The second group of drugs is known as "5-alpha reductase inhibitors". These drugs act to reduce the level of male hormone within the prostate gland which, in turn, cause the prostate gland itself to shrink slightly. This can however be a slow process and most patients will need to take 5-alpha reductase inhibitors for 6 to 12 months before the effects are felt.

5-alpha reductase inhibitors are normally taken orally once a day and side effects can include erectile dysfunction, a decrease in sexual desire and a reduction in the amount of semen produced during ejaculation.

As both alpha-blockers and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors act quite differently to reduce prostate symptoms it is not uncommon to enhance the effects of treatment by prescribing both drugs together.

Further information on prostate medicine:

Ride For Dad will raise funds for prostate cancer - Medicine Hat News


Medicine Hat News

Ride For Dad will raise funds for prostate cancer
Medicine Hat News
Tony Mitton has survived prostate cancer, twice. Now Mitton is organizing Medicine Hat's first ever Ride For Dad event this Friday. “It's open to anybody who has a motorcycle and wants to ride with us,” said Mitton. All proceeds from the event will go ...

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Steba offers prostate cancer patients a better approach - Globes


Globes

Steba offers prostate cancer patients a better approach
Globes
Jack Baniel, head of the prostate cancer center at the Ramat Aviv medical Center, which began performing the experimental treatments with the medicine, said: “The competing approaches are not as precise as the Steba solution, and they are many more ...

From genes to therapies -- Systems Medicine of Neuro Endocrine Prostate Cancer - Beyond the Abstract - UroToday


UroToday

From genes to therapies -- Systems Medicine of Neuro Endocrine Prostate Cancer - Beyond the Abstract
UroToday
Whereas many of the prostate cancers can have positive outcomes with such strategies, some will break through and become, what is called resistant to hormonal manipulations or castrate resistant in the medical parlance. Why some prostate cancers ...

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PET/CT imaging of prostate cancer proves accurate biopsy guide - EurekAlert (press release)


EurekAlert (press release)

PET/CT imaging of prostate cancer proves accurate biopsy guide
EurekAlert (press release)
... oncologists are considering prostate-specific molecular imaging at the point of initial biopsy and pre-operative planning to root out the full extent of disease, researchers revealed at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and ...

and more »